CQI Concepts and Implementation

  • A Framework for Quality Assurance in Child Welfare, (2002), National Child Welfare Resource Center for Organizational Improvement, retrieved from LINK. This framework of quality assurance (QA) systems is based on examples from existing State systems, requirements from Federal legislation, Child Welfare research, and national QA standards. There is a discussion of the difference between QA and CQI, and details are provided of the five main steps of the QA framework, including State examples for each step.
  • Continuous Quality Improvement, Child Welfare Information Gateway, retrieved from LINK. This article provides an overview of CQI, including planning and implementation. Additionally, State examples are provided.
  • Continuous Quality Improvement in Title IV-B and IV-E Programs, (2012), Administration for Children and Families Information Memorandum 12-07, retrieved from LINK. This Information Memorandum (IM) provides information that State child welfare agencies can use to establish and maintain CQI systems. It also provides information on claiming allowable Federal financial participation costs for CQI systems.
  • Dedhia, N., (2008), Continuous Improvement Requires a Quality Culture, retrieved from LINK. The article describes in detail the culture needed in organizations to set the stage for implementing and sustaining continuous quality improvement.
  • Dever, A., Public Health Practice and Continuous Quality Improvement, Improving Outcomes in Public Health Practice: Strategy and Methods [chapter and book], information retrieved from LINK. This chapter defines CQI in health care settings and, in chart form, clearly delineates in detail the differences between quality control/assurance and CQI, and “conventional thinking” and “CQI thinking.”
  • Getting Ready for CQI: A Webinar for Child Welfare Agency Directors and Administrators, (2013), North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Social Services, Child Protective Services, retrieved from LINK; accompanying handouts, including a pre-implementation data gathering tool, are retrieved from LINK. This webinar presents a panel discussion of the North Carolina agency’s efforts to implement its CQI program, focusing on the four key areas of readiness, including agency climate and engagement of partners.
  • Introduction to CQI History, (2004), Loyola Medicine and Illinois Department of Public Health, retrieved from LINK. This article provides a history of CQI, presents the “Plan, Do, Study, Act” methodology and “14 points” to creative management, and discusses institutional barriers to implementation in the emergency medical services field.
  • Juran and Deming, Prism Consultancy, retrieved from LINK. The article discusses CQI in the context of the work of the early pioneers of the process, Dr. J.M. Juran and Dr. W. Edwards Deming, and compares and contrasts the work of the two. Many interesting concepts are discussed, including “Rules of the Road” for overcoming employee fear of change when establishing a CQI culture.
  • Kaizan, a Model for Continuous Improvement, Aberdeenshire Council, Northeast Scotland, paper presented at International Leading Practices Symposium, Queensland, Australia, May 2008, retrieved from LINK (note: to open this file, please paste the complete link into your browser window). This paper provides an overview of improvements made in the services of a Scottish [regional governing] Council, using the Kaizan [Japanese] model of CQI. It highlights the employee contributions and combined benefits of measurable performance improvements and culture change. The article charts the Council’s CQI planning and implementation activities from 2004 to 2008 and notes that the Council’s project earned a European Excellence award.
  • McKay, M., First CQI Projects in Family Support, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, retrieved from LINK. This PowerPoint presentation discusses principles involved in the “Plan, Do, Check, Act” steps of CQI as applied to support for youth and families in the psychiatric setting. CQI actions for individual staff members are stressed.
  • QI 101, Loyola University Health System, retrieved from LINK. This site, in an auxiliary paper, provides a history of quality improvement, illustrated by the concepts of early CQI pioneers Joseph Juran, Philip Crosby, and W. Edwards Deming, and discusses barriers to effective CQI implementation. Additionally, the site discusses the importance of CQI and provides links to numerous other resources that recount the history, tools, and techniques developed and used in CQI.
  • Quality Improvement in Social Care, Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership [of the United Kingdom], retrieved from LINK. This site proposes that social care [social services] systems in the U.K. should implement systematic CQI systems that mirror those of health care, and it provides a discussion of the cycles of CQI.
  • Sollecito, W., and Johnson, J., (2012), The Global Evolution of Continuous Quality Improvement: From Japanese Manufacturing to Global Health Services, retrieved from LINK. The article posits that CQI, used very successfully in other industries, remains a critical need for much of the Nation’s health care field. Detail is provided about the “evolution of the quality movement,” beginning with the Japanese auto industry in 1950.
  • Sperber, K., CQI 101: Building and Sustaining an Effective Infrastructure, retrieved from LINK. This PowerPoint presentation provides information on the formation of a CQI system from beginning to end, stressing the major components that make up each step of the system; short- and long-term benefits of a CQI program are clearly stated.
  • Tout, K., Isner, T., and Zaslow, M., (2011), Coaching for Quality Improvement: Lessons Learned from Quality Rating and Improvement Systems, retrieved from LINK. This research brief summarizes the results of a full research study done to determine whether coaching and mentoring in Quality Rating and Improvement Systems [QRIS] in early childhood settings resulted in more positive outcomes for both practitioners and children. The brief concludes with an overview of implications for coaching in QRIS early childhood settings.
  • Using CQI to Improve Child Welfare Practice, (2005), National Child Welfare Resource Center for Organizational Improvement, retrieved from LINK. This article provides a discussion of the results of a meeting of 28 national child welfare CQI experts who were brought together to develop a framework for the implementation of CQI in child welfare agencies; the article includes information on establishing a CQI-receptive culture.
  • What is Continuous Quality Improvement?, National Resource Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention, retrieved from LINK. The article explains the “Plan, Do, Study, Act,” model of CQI and also discusses the differences between evidence-informed practice, evidence-based practice, and evidence-based programs.
  • Wulczyn, F., Chapin Hall, (2007), Monitoring Child Welfare Programs: Performance Improvement in a CQI Context, Center for Children at the University of Chicago, retrieved from LINK. The authors explain the major steps involved in a CQI program, discuss the cycle of improvement, and provide examples to clearly explain each step.